If I Don’t Move, You Can’t See Me…

Wishful thinking? Can a grasshopper have wishes? I know a grasshopper can be very aware of me, the photographer!

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Frozen in Time - Grasshopper - 2010

When I moved to one side to get a better view of him, he would  edge around the twig to the other side where I could not see him as well. I finally had to use one hand to kind of wave at him so that he would edge away from my hand into the view of my camera. I caught him, though!

Just a Fuzzy Muzzle!

Still bedewed with water droplets from his frigid early morning drink, Blaze’s fuzzy little muzzle is silhouetted against the sunrise.

Refreshing! - Winter 2011


This adorable post: http://h2obyjoanna.wordpress.com/2012/02/10/41365-snowy-nose-of-a-shetlander/ – from h2o by Joanna, a fellow photography blogger, is what reminded me of my shot of Blaze.

Beaded Grass

Fashion and nature: beaded and fringed dress, spiraling around the body.
It was actually this morning, when attempting to photograph frost crystals, that I started to think about nature and fashion. I will post one of this morning’s photos later, I hope, after my battery has recharged (and my camera’s battery, lol) and I have examined the photos.

Still, turn this upside down and I can imagine a flapper’s dress, can’t you?

Blue and Green Summer Afternoon

Today is bright and sunny, triggering today’s afternoon flashback. It is quite a cheerful looking day. But step outside and your mood may change; it is brisk, to put a nice spin on it. Cold, frigid compared to recent days in the 60s.

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Does this summer sight help you smell and hear echoes of summer? 2011

Looking out the window, feeling the heat through the windows, called to mind this summer afternoon in Harlan, Iowa, 2011. Warm in the sun, slightly less warm in the shade. Humming insects, gentle lapping of waves, soft susurating breeze…

Arctic Cartoon Mosquito?

This is another flashback to warmer, sunnier days. Last spring I set out to photograph the wild plum blossoms – and revel in their heady scent.

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Happily for me, it is more interested in nectar than in my blood - Spring 2011

As I moved around to find blossoms highlighted by sunlight, I was not the only one interested in the sunny, sweet smelling blooms. In fact, there were numerous visitors of many sizes and shapes, but the most astounding to me was this odd creature. I realize it sort of resembles a bumblebee, but I do not think it is a bee at all. What it most looks like to me is those cartoon mosquitoes with pointy proboscii (is that a plural for proboscis?). Only this one is dressed for cold weather, rather like an Eskimo, and his/her face is all whiskery like a Schnauzer. Of course, now I have exited the realms of science and, rather, entered cartoon-landia, but none-the-less, I wanted to share this marvelous little creature. 🙂 And I loved the light sparkling off the fur on his back!

Good Golly, Miss Molly, I’ve Never Seen That Before!

I started out focusing on a patch of lavender-pink Bee Balm (I think that’s what the flowers are), seeking to capture the glow of sunlight through their translucent petals. Then I noticed perfectly camouflaged little insects, their green the color of the leaves, their pink matching the petals, and their graceful black-and-white striped antennae seeming extensions of the flowers’ own reaching stamens.

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This secret world is why I like to leave large swathes of our 40 acres UN-mown.

I caught a focused shot of one, but I didn’t want to lose the whole image of the flower with the insect hidden in its petals, so I enlarged just the insect and super-imposed it over the image of itself on the flower. So you can see both the enlargement and the original image combined into one photoshopped image.

I hope you enjoy your glimpse into this tiny, hidden world as much as I enjoyed discovering and recording it!

Candy Stripes

This afternoon’s flashback was triggered by memories of taking photos of flowers like this morning’s frost-covered blossom nearly one year ago. This is a clearer view of the details, unobscured by the sugary-looking frost crystals of this morning’s shot.

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Sweet Little Candy Striped Flowers - March 19, 2011

Are these flowers blooming earlier this year? Or did I simply not see them last year under the 16 inches of snow we had the first week of February?!

Sounds of Summer

Afternoon flashback: I was thinking how the sounds of summer are different than the sounds of winter. The symphony starts with spring peepers, early in the year, then builds through the months, finally reaching a crescendo near summer’s end, when the cicadas add their insistent hum to the sounds around.

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The Shell Out of Which a Cicada Hatched - Summer 2011

Growing up in New York State, I don’t recall ever hearing (or at least noticing) cicadas. I was in Japan when I first noticed the  蝉(せみ)- cicada. Since that is where I first became aware of that hum of late summer, I always think of them first by their Japanese name. It is pronounced “semi,” the e is a short e, the i is pronounced as in Latin, with a long e sound. The call of the cicada seems to herald the onset of Autumn.

The Grass Was Greener

While this is a portrait of Blaze, Bridger’s POA (a Pony of the Americas – basically an Appaloosa in miniature), it is also an afternoon flashback, to a time when the grass was green. To when there was grass to be green! In the past we would have noticed Blaze’s eager expression, his black and white and pink coloring, his ratty old halter… This time when we saw this photo, Bridger and I both thought, “Wow, look how green that grass is!”

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Blaze - Study in Black & White & Green - October 2010

We know Blaze and his buddies join us in hoping La Nina will relent and we will soon see green grass growing in the pastures.

Katydid

Afternoon flashback: It is summer. The fields are alive with chirping and any move through the grass scares up hundreds of grasshoppers. Or are they crickets? Or katydids?The photo here is of a katydid. I love its long, graceful antennae, and that’s how we can tell it is not a grasshopper, despite the fact that it lives in the grass and hops wildly when disturbed.

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Katydid - Summer 2011

The chickens don’t care whether the hoppers are crickets, grasshoppers or katydids, they just love chasing them across the lawn and into the pastures. The best part for them is catching and eating these apparently delicious insects!