Taking a Break

A small, slightly battered butterfly rests on a partially burned log in the woods.

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Nikon D5100 f/11 ISO 400 1/350s Nikkor 55-300@300mm – Summer 2012

One small spot of sunlight picked him out, showing his beauty against the darkness beyond.

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Face Off!

Tiny toad versus butterfly! Who will survive?

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Nikon D5100 f/16 ISO 800 1/180 s Nikkor 55-300@170mm – Summer 2012

Actually, the toad held perfectly still and ignored the butterfly as it walked past, picking up moisture from the mud with its proboscis. The butterfly seemed totally oblivious to the toad (which really resembled at tiny bump of mud)… If it had been a larger toad, I think the butterfly would have become dinner. Maybe.

Just in case the photo doesn’t make it plain, I want to tell you this is a truly tiny toad, around 1/2 inch long!

Don’t move

Insects often become aware of the photographer’s attention and either freeze or leave. This brightly colored little one froze, affording me the opportunity to take several shots.

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Rarely does one threaten or attack. I don’t know why some people go into a panicked, jumping frenzy when they spot an insect less than a hundredth their size!  With just a little quiet observation, a person can learn much.

Clinging!

It was a windy day. Many insects dropped out of trees, grabbing for any (hand)hold they could grasp.

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Must. Hold. Tight! – June 2012

The wind was buffeting this katydid, but it clung tenaciously, allowing me a few magical moments of shooting 🙂

The focus is disappointing, which I attribute to the windiness of the day. But one only gets a few takes before the insect gets nervous and leaves. Really, I wouldn’t eat it, but try getting it to believe that!